Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

as the objectionable parts generally admit of easy separation. I must praise Gifford1 for his services as an Editor, and need not say much of my very low opinion of his abilities as a Critic. Or what say you to Retzsch Illustrations of Macbeth,2 which might furnish occasion for an ingenious if not very profound examination of 'Ut Pictura, Poesis' which is not more than half true? But I must conclude, the rather as I shall have occasion to write again in two or three days, and have to shave before I can take this to the post. Miss Wordsworth is, I fear, much the same, nor likely to be much better. There are, I fear also, small hopes for Aunt. Dora improves. Mrs. Parry is a sad sufferer. Why are good people ever ill? It is a sad mistake in education to persuade young people that virtue will exempt them from suffering, or turn the world into a happy valley. The trick is soon found out, and then they think with Brutus--'Virtue, what art thou but a name'--and a bore? An excellent paper might be written, 'On the inutility of lying, considered as a mean of moral improvement.' I am delighted to hear that Sara goes on so well. Give ten thousand loves to her. Mama never says any thing about her own health. I will write to Derwent soon. We have had an unusually gay Christmas. I had Sweet's 2d. Ed., a bible, and Worthies. I know not how to get a Janus3 but could learn. Love to the dears.

Yours, in great haste H.C.


LETTER 52

To MRS. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE, No. 27 Downshire Hill, Hampstead.

Grasmere, Jan. 18, 1836. Raining Cats and Dogs.

My dear Mother and Sister

After posing for some time which of you to address, I have determined, like the widow'd queen of Chrononhotonthologos,4 to have you both. But this is not a proper strain to commence with, considering the solemn subject of dear Henry's last letter,5 which with its black seal and edges, almost made me faint (I am not exaggerating, I was as sick as

____________________
1
Gifford edited Massinger's plays in four volumes for Murray, in 1813.
2
Cf. F. A. M. Retzsch Outlines of Shakspear, Macbeth, 1833.
3
In 1826 Hartley made four contributions to the Janus, an annual.
4
See Henry Carey's play by this title.
5
H. N. Coleridge's father, Colonel James Coleridge, died in 1836.

-182-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.