Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

LETTER 55

To JOHN TAYLOR COLERIDGE.

[ Grasmere. October, 1836.]

Honoured Kinsman

I shall be most happy to wait on you at four. 1 Indeed, were I quite sure of finding you at home, I would come much earlier that we might discuss matters at length.

As to the prefatory essay, I have been consulting about it with myself. I should not shrink from the task, were [it only] my father's character as a poet, a Critic, and in general a literateur (will it not offend his manes to be characterised by a French word?), but I am hardly capable of arguing his philosophy at present. Indeed my opinion is that no view of it should be attempted, till his remarks are all before the public.

Yours truly, H. COLERIDGE.


LETTER 56

To MRS. SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE, Downshire Place, Hampstead.

Rotha Some place--Oct. 28, [1836.]

Deep snow, is it so with you? My dear Mother

One of your dear old phrases, recorded I doubt not, in the lingo grande, was between hawk and buzzard. Now I have been exactly between Hawk and Buzzard with regard to you and yours, and, my dear Mother, but I--[sic] for some months past. You would, therefore, naturally excuse me for a little confusion of memory, seeing I am but a bat, fluttering between Hawk and Buzzard, owing my safety only to a comU+0AD pact between the two aristocratic Accipitres, never to feed on carrion. But now, Mother, for the application of the Fable. I should have written to Henry, long before now, indeed, as soon as the judge shewed me, not his epistle, for that I never saw-it was sent to Keswick, but the extract from his epistle-- of and concerning the introduction to the Biographia Literaria. But first, concerning the said introduction, I must tell you that it is doing, and will by the time this letter reaches you,

____________________
1
John Taylor Coleridge had taken Fox How (the Arnold residence in Grasmere) from the end of the long vacation, after Dr. Arnold had returned to Rugby.

-198-

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