Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

death, and it is with Nab Cottage that he is most often associated. The Nab is about a half-mile from Rydal Mount, so that Hartley was now settled almost at the feet of Wordsworth.

Certain changes have been made in Nab Cottage, but when one looks into Hartley's room something of the romantic flavour seems to remain. Fortunately a good description of the cottage and Hartley's room has been preserved.

'The cottage, is close upon the road which winds right under the scar and by the Lake, very low, and somewhat darkened by the mass of ivy which has got a footing on the old bird-nest chimney. Most days the window-blind was down, so that when you were in the room you had "a light much like a shade." Hartley was seldom in in summer or fine weather, it was only on dull cold days or in the evenings that he was at home and the fire was lit. Then the little chamber looked snug and cosy-- one side was occupied by something which resembled rather a pigeon-box than a book-case. Then there was a door covered with red baize that looked like the entrance to a closet, but which you found to be the receptacle for a little white- curtained bed. The fire-place had large hobs, and what schoolboys would call "caves" where pipes rested. Over the mantlepiece hung a cocked Hat and feather and a sword, I believe his father's, and a print of one of his earliest friends --within arm's length of an old cushioned chair with dark grotesque arms was the book he most used, Anderson's British Poets. Floor and table and window-seat were piled up with dusty papers. When a visitor came the landlady brought an extra candle, and on special occasions bannock cakes.'


LETTER 71
To HENRY NELSON COLERIDGE, No. 10 Chester Place, Regent's Park.

The Nab, July 10, [Postmark 1840.]

Dear Henry

Your request deeply affected me, so deeply indeed, that notwithstanding your urgency, for an immediate answer, I have not been able till now to girdle up the loins of my resolution to a definite reply. As I have already no less than five God-children, in none of whom I have the same interest of blood as in your expected--I can of course plead no scruple of conscience. It will not--I trust--fall to my lot to train up the child in the way it should go. The Church could never mean to exonerate Christian parents from their most sacred and peculiar duty. How or in what cases, Sponsors should be allowed or call'd on to interfere or assist, is a question of

-239-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.