Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

LETTER85
To MARY CLAUDE.

Dear Mary

[ 1844.]

When thoughts too mighty crowd upon the brain For usual phrase to utter or retain, Then--the quaint art of verse--the neat disguise Of many fancy-breeding similes-- Helps to unload a mind too sorely prest; For motion sometimes eases more than rest. Of birth, and death, of hope begun and ended, Of two good Spirits to their home ascended, Of one dear soul, with tiny body blent Mere life as yet, a breathing innocent, Are all the tidings that I have to tell-- What can I say, but that they all--are well?

She, long a pain-expecting sufferer, Is now released--our loss is gain to her. Kind Death unknit the sad perplexity Of his worse sorrows' awful mystery. Doubt not she hath a spiritual frame of light That bears no symbol of the scars, which Eve Bequeath'd to all her offspring, sore or slight; But all must bear the portion they receive-- And surely he hath now his mind again. No frail dependent upon nerve or brain, But a pure reason, face to face to see The truths he once believed in pure humility.1

Very bad, but they hint at my meaning--I will write more in a day or two.

Believe me, with best love to all, Yours affectionately

H. COLERIDGE.


LETTER86 To DERWENT COLERIDGE, St. Mark's College, Chelsea, London.

Ambleside,

April 12, [Postmark 1845.]

Dear Derwent

If not corresponsive you will at least admit that I am on this occasion--responsive. May you and your good lady have

____________________
1
'Unpublished--The references are, I guess, to old Betty, the Southeys' servant, and to Southey himself. The "one dear soul, with tiny body blent"-- must be Christabel Rose Coleridge, born May 25, 1843.' Note by E. H. Coleridge .

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Letters of Hartley Coleridge
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.