Letters of Hartley Coleridge

By Grace Griggs Evelyn; Earl Griggs Leslie et al. | Go to book overview

LETTER 93
To MRS. HENRY NELSON COLERIDGE, No. 10 Chester Place, Regent's Park, London.

Nab. May 18th, 1874.

Dear Sara

Excuse me, I am the last man in the world that ought to be fidgety about not receiving of letters, and I am justly enough punished for my own frequent delinquencies in that line, but I really am uneasy about my last containing the papers about the income Tax. That you have received it, I know from Mrs. Richardson's letter. Perhaps there is some trouble or delay, I did not anticipate--I hope you are not ill. If it is not right, you would have informed me before now.

I have nothing more hopeful to relate of Dora. She is sometimes easy, and sometimes in considerable pain-- suffers most at night. She has been at her own request, fully informed of her state, and is not only resign'd but happy. Her parents bear up like Christians, but are quite absorb'd by their sorrow. I have not seen them--(excepting Mr. Words- worth on the road, as I told you before). I would gladly go, if I could be of any use or comfort, but the Doctor advises me not. They wish to see no one. If they should wish to speak to me, they will probably send for me. Poor William was over from Carlisle a day or two ago, to take leave. John was at Rydal lately and administered the sacrament to his sister, a trying duty which he well supported. From what I gather, I anticipate it will not be long be very long. God's will be done--

With love to Edith, I remain Dear Sister

In hope of a line

Your truly affectionate,

H. C.

N. B. Mrs. Claude is returned, which is a great comfort to me.


LETTER 94
To MRS. HENRY NELSON COLERIDGE.

[ 1847.]

Dear Sara

Knowing that I deserved, and fully expected a sound rating for not answering your last about 'the Doctor', it will be some satisfaction, however, to you, that I did answer Mr.

-294-

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