The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY OF PRINCIPAL EVENTS IN THE LIFE OF JOHN KEATS
1795. Oct. 31. Birth in Finsbury.
Dec. 18. Christened at St. Botolph's, Bishopsgate.
1797. Feb. 28. Birth of his brother George.
1799. Nov. 18. Birth of his brother Thomas.
1801. Apr. 28. Birth of his brother Edward. (Died in infancy.)
1803. June 3. Birth of his sister Frances Mary (Fanny).
1804. Apr. 16. Death of his father: buried at St. Stephen's,
Coleman Street, April 23.
June 27. His mother marries William Rawlings at St.
George's, Hanover Square.
1804-10. Living with his grandmother, Mrs. Jennings, at
Edmonton.
1810. Death of his mother: buried at St. Stephen's,
March 20.
1803-11. Educated at Clarke's School, Enfield.
Begins translating 'The Aeneid'.
1811. Summer. Apprenticed to Thomas Hammond, Surgeon.
Finishes 'The Aeneid'.
1812. Writes 'Imitation of Spenser'.
1813. Introduced to Severn.
1814. Dec. Death of his grandmother, Alice Jennings:
buried at St. Stephen's, Dec. 19.
1815. Feb. 2. Writes Sonnet on the day Leigh Hunt left prison.
Oct. 1. Entered at Guy's Hospital.
Nov. Writes 'Epistle to George Felton Mathew'.
1816. May 5. First published poem, Sonnet, 'O Solitude!',
appears in 'The Examiner'.
June 29. Addresses a Sonnet to Charles Wells on receiving
a bunch of roses.
July 25. Takes the Apothecaries' Society's Certificate.
Writes the Chapman's Homer Sonnet.
Aug. Writes 'Epistle to George Keats', at Margate.
Sept. Writes 'Epistle to Charles Cowden Clarke'.
Nov. Introduced to Haydon and writes Sonnet to him.
Dec. 1. Calls on Leigh Hunt with Cowden Clarke.
Dec. Contemplates the subject of 'Endymion' and
writes 'I stood tip-toe upon a little hill'.
Meets Shelley and Horace Smith at Leigh Hunt's
cottage.
1817. Mar. 3. First book of 'Poems' published.
Spring. Meets Taylor, Hessey, Woodhouse, and Bailey.
Begins 'Endymion'.
Apr. 15. At Carisbrooke, Isle of Wight.
May. At Margate, where Tom Keats joins him.
May 16. Goes to Canterbury.
June 10. Back at Hampstead.

-xxix-

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