The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

1Great Spirits now on earth are sojourning
He of the Cloud, the Cataract, the Lake
Who on Helvellyn's summit wide awake
Catches his freshness from Archangel's wing
He of the Rose, the Violet, the Spring
The social smile, the Chain for Freedom's sake;
And lo!--whose stedfastness would never take
A meaner sound than Raphael's Whispering.
And other Spirits are there standing apart
Upon the Forehead of the age to come;
These, these will give the World another Heart
And other Pulses--hear ye not the hum
Of mighty workings? - - - - - - - - - .
Listen awhile ye Nations and be dumb!


7. To CHARLES COWDEN CLARKE. Tuesday 17 Dec. 1816.

Address: Mr C. C. Clarke Mr Towers's Warner Street-- Clerkenwell--

Postmarks: LOMBARD ST. and DE 17 1816.

Tuesday--

My dear Charles,

You may now look at Minerva's Ægis with impunity, seeing that my awful Visage did not turn you into a John Doree you have accordingly a legitimate title to a Copy--I will use my interest to procure it for you.2 I'll tell you what--I met Reynolds at Haydon's a few mornings since --he promised to be with me this evening and Yesterday I had the same promise from Severn and I must put you in Mind that on last All hallowmas' day you gave you〈r〉 word that you would spend this Evening with me--so no putting off. I have done little to Endymion3 lately--I hope to finish it in one more attack--I believe you I went to Richards's4--it was so whoreson a Night that I stopped

____________________
1
Haydon retained this copy with Keats's letter and made a fresh copy for Wordsworth, sending it in a letter dated the 31st of December, 1816; see "'Correspondence and Table-Talk', ii". 30.
2
This probably refers to one of Severn's portraits of Keats.
3
The reference is to the short poem originally so called, but ultimately published in 1817 without a title. It begins with the words 'I stood tiptoe upon a little hill'.
4
Possibly C. Richards of 18 Warwick Street, Golden Square, the printer of the 1817 volume, but more probably Thomas Richards of the Storekeeper's Office of the Ordnance Department in the Tower.

-12-

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