The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview
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I am nearly as bad again--Just now I opened Spencer, and the first Lines I saw were these.--

"The noble Heart that harbors virtuous thought,
And is with Child of glorious great intent,
Can never rest, until it forth have brought
Th' eternal Brood of Glory excellent--"1

Let me know particularly about Haydon; ask him to write to me about Hunt, if it be only ten lines--I hope all is well --I shall forthwith begin my Endymion,2 which I hope I shall have got some way into by the time you come, when we will read our verses in a delightful place I have set my heart upon near the Castle--Give my Love to your Sisters severally--To George and Tom--Remember me to Rice Mr and Mrs Dilk〈e〉 and all we know--

Your sincere Friend John Keats.

Direct J. Keats, Mrs Cook's new Village, Carisbrooke


14. To LEIGH HUNT. Saturday 10 May 1817.

Address: Leigh Hunt Esqre P. B. Shelley's Esqre Gt Marlow Bucks--

Postmarks: 11 MY 1817 and 12 MY 1817.

Margate May 10th--

My dear Hunt,

The little Gentleman that sometimes lurks in a gossips bowl ought to have come in very likeness of a coasted3 crab and choaked me outright for not having answered your Letter ere this--however you must not suppose that I was in Town to receive it; no, it followed me to the isle of Wight and I got it just as I was going to pack up for Margate, for reasons which you anon shall hear. On arriving at this treeless affair I wrote to my Brother George to request C. C. C.4 to do the thing you wot of respecting Rimini; and George tells me he has undertaken it with great Pleasure; so I hope there has been an understanding between you for many Proofs-- --C. C. C. is well acquainted with

____________________
1
'Faerie Queen', I. v. 1-4.
2
This refers to the real 'Endymion', to be published in the following year.
3
Keats wrote 'coasted', but he meant 'roasted' crab-apple. Cf. "'Midsummer-Night's Dream'", II. i. 47-8.
4
Charles Cowden Clarke.

-22-

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