The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

Spright that the "g〈r〉een sour ringlets makes whereof the Ewe not bites"1 had manufactured it of the dew fallen on said sour ringlets--I think I could make a nice little A〈l〉legorical Poem called "the Dun"--Where we wo〈u〉ld have the Castle of Carelessness--the Draw Bridge of Credit-- Sir Novelty Fashion' 〈s〉2 expedition against the City of Taylors--&c &c.-- -- -- I went day by day at my Poem for a Month--at the end of which time the other day I found my Brain so overwrought that I had neither Rhyme nor reason in it--so was obliged to give up for a few days-- I hope soon to be able to resume my Work--I have endeavoured to do so once or twice but to no Purpose-- instead of Poetry--I have a swimming in my head--And feel all the effects of a Mental Debauch--lowness of Spirits-- anxiety to go on without the Power to do so which does not at all tend to my ultimate Progression--However tomorrow I will begin my next Month. This Evening I go to Canterbury--having got tired of Margate--I was not right in my head when I came--At Canty. I hope the Remembrance of Chaucer will set me forward like a Billiard-Ball--I am gald to hear of Mr T's health and of the Wellfare of the In-town-Stayers" and think Reynolds will like his trip--I have some idea of seeing the Continent some time in the Summer--

In repeating how sensible I am of your kindness I remain

Your Obedient Servt and Friend--
John Keats--

I shall be very happy to hear any little intelligence in the literrary or friendly way when you have time to scribble.

Messrs Taylor and Hessey.--


17. To TAYLOR and HESSEY. Tuesday 10 June 1817.

Address: Messrs Taylor and Hessey ∣ Publishers ∣ [Fleet Street--

Postmarks: LAMBS CONDUIT ST. and 10 JU 1817.

Tuesday Morn--

My dear Sirs,

I must endeavor to lose my Maidenhead with respect

____________________
1
'Tempest', v. i. 37-8.
2
In Colley Cibber 'Love's Last Shift' ( 1695-6). Sir Novelty became Lord Foppington in Vanbrugh 'Relapse' ( 1696).

-34-

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