The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

mense accomplishment of speaking it--it is none at all-- a most lamentable mistake indeed. Italian indeed would sound most musically from Lips which had b〈e〉gan to pronounce it as early as french is cramne'd down our Mouths, as if we were young Jackdaws at the mercy of an overfeeding Schoolboy.

Now Fanny you must write soon--and write all you think about, never mind what--only let me have a good deal of your writing--You need not do it all at once--be two or three or four day〈s〉 about it, and let it be a diary of your little Life. You will preserve all my Letters and I will secure yours--and thus in the course of time we shall each of us have a good Bundle--which, hereafter, when things may have strangely altered and god knows what happened, we may read over together and look with pleasure on times past--that now are to come. Give my Respects to the Ladies--and so my dear Fanny I am ever

Your most affectionate Brother John

If you direct--Post Office Oxford--your Letter will be brought to me--


20. To JANE REYNOLDS.1 〈Sept. 1817.〉

No address or postmark.

My dear Jane,

You must not expect that your Porcupine quill is to be shot at me with impunity--without you mean to question the existance of the Pyramids or rout Sir Isa〈a〉c Newton out of his Coffin. If I did not think you had a kind of preferenc〈e〉 yourself for Juliet I would not say a word more about it--but as I know people love to be reminded of those they most love--'t is with me a certain thing that you are merely fishing for a little proing and conning thereon--As for you〈r〉 accusation〈s〉 I perhaps may answer them like Haydon in a Postcript--. If you go on at this rate I shall always have you in my imagination side by side with Bailey's Picture of Jeremy Taylor1 who always looks as if he were going to hit me a rap with a Book he hold〈s〉 in a very threatning position My head is always

____________________
1
This letter is written on an undated portion of a letter in Benjamin Bailey's hand-writing. The picture of Jeremy Taylor to which Keats refers is probably the portrait by Lombard published in folio.

-40-

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