The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

feel from my employment that I shall never be again secure in Robustness--would that you were as well as

your sincere friend & brother
John Keats--

The Dilk〈e〉s are expected to day.


26. To BENJAMIN BAILEY. 〈October 1817.〉1

Address: Mr B. Bailey Magdalen Hall Oxford.

Postmark: illegible.

My dear Bailey,

So you have got a Curacy! good but I suppose you will be obliged to stop among your Oxford favorites during term time--never mind. When do you p〈r〉each your first Sermon tell me for I shall propose to the two Rs2 to hear it, so dont look into any of the old corner oaken pews, for fear of being put out by us--Poor Johnny Martin3 can't be there He is ill I suspect--but that's neither here nor there --all I can say I wish him as well through it as I am like to be. For this fortnight I have been confined at Hampstead--Saturday evening was my first day in town--when I went to Rices as we intend to do every Saturday till we know not when--Rice had some business at Highgate yesterday--so he came over to me, and detained me for the first time of I hope 24860 times. We hit upon an old Gent we had known some few years ago and had a veray pleausante daye,. In this World there is no quiet nothing but teasing and snubbing and vexation--my brother Tom look'd very unwell yesterday and I am for shipping him off to Lisbon--perhaps I ship there with him. I have not seen Mrs Reynolds since I left you wherefore my conscience smites me--I think of seeing her tomorrow have you any Message? I hope Gleg came soon after I left.

I dont suppose I've w〈r〉itten as many Lines as you have read Volumes or at least Chapters since I saw you. However, I am in a fair way now to come to a conclusion in at least three Weeks when I assure you I shall be glad to dismount for a Month or two although I'll keep as tight a reign as possible till then nor suffer myself to sleep. I will copy for you the opening of the 4 Book--in which you

____________________
1
See footnote to letter 27, p. 58.
2
Probably John Hamilton Reynolds and James Rice, possibly Jane and Mariane Reynolds.
3
John Martin, see p. 48, note 1.

-54-

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