The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

been about somewhere ever since. Where? What? Well I rejoice almost that I have not heard from you because no news is good news. I cannot for the world recollect why I was called away, all I know is that there has been a dance at Dilke's, and another at the London Coffee House;1 to both of which I went. But I must tell you in another letter the circumstances thereof--for though a week should have passed since I wrote on the other side it quite appals me--I can only write in scraps and patches. Brown is returned from Hampstead--Haydon has returned an answer in the same style--they are all dreadfully irritated against each other. On Sunday I saw Hunt and dined with Haydon, met Hazlitt and Bewick2 there, and took Haslam with me--forgot to speak about Crips though I broke my engagement to Haslam's on purpose. Mem.-- Haslam came to meet me, found me at Breakfast, had the goodness to go with me my way. I have just finished the revision of my First Book, and shall take it to Taylor's to-morrow. Do not let me see many days pass without hearing from you.

Your most affectionate Brother,

John.


38. To BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON. Friday 23 〈Jan. 1818〉.

No address or postmark.

Friday 23rd__

My dear Haydon,

I have a complete fellow-feeling with you in this business --so much so that it would be as well to wait for a choice out of Hyperion--when that Poem is done there will be a wide range for you--in Endymion I think you may have many bits of the deep and sentimental cast--the nature of Hyperion will lead me to treat it in a more naked and grecian Manner--and the march of passion and endeavour will be undeviating--and one great contrast between them

____________________
1
On Ludgate Hill, near St. Paul's Churchyard: it was closed in 1867.
2
William Bewick ( 1795-1866) writing to his brother on the 11th of February 1818 says: 'I have been at two or three very intellectual dinners since I came. Amongst the company were Horatio Smith, * * *, Keats the poet, Hazlitt the critic, Haydon, Hunt the publisher, &c. &c.'

-82-

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