The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

Of Madness? God of Song
Thou bearest me along
Through sights I scarce can bear
O let me, let me share
With the hot Lyre and thee,
The staid Philosophy.
Temper my lonely hours,
And let me see thy bow'rs
More unalarm'd!--

My Dear Reynolds, you must forgive all this ranting-- but the fact is, I cannot write sense this Morning--however you shall have some. I will copy my last Sonnet.

When I have fears that I may cease to be
Before my pen has glean'd my teeming brain,
Before high piled Books in charactery
Hold like full garners the full ripen'd grain--
When I behold upon the night's starr'd face
Huge cloudy symbols of a high romance,
And feel that I may never live to trace
Their shadows with the magic hand of chance:
And when I feel, fair creature of an hour,
That I shall never look upon thee more
Never have relish in the fairy power
Of unreflecting Love: then on the Shore
Of the wide world I stand alone and think
Till Love and Fame to Nothingness do sink.--

I must take a turn, and then write to Teignmouth. Remember me to all, not excepting yourself.

Your sincere friend,
John Keats.


44. To JOHN HAMILTON REYNOLDS. Tuesday 3 Feb. 1818.

Address and postmark not recorded.

Hampstead, Tuesday.

My dear Reynolds,

I thank you for your dish of Filberts--Would I could get a basket of them by way of des〈s〉ert every day for the sum of two-pence1--Would we were a sort of ethereal Pigs,

____________________
1
Two sonnets on Robin Hood, sent by the 'twopenny post'--afterwards printed in 'The Yellow Dwarf' for the 21st of February, 1818,

-94-

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