The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

very unwell--he has all kinds of distressing Symptoms, and I am on this account rather glad that he has not spare time for one of our right Sort meetings--he would go to〈o〉 far for his health.

I was right glad of your Letter from Devonshire--whereby that is I hope one day to see it--right sorry that you are going back to day. I hope 'tis not for long--I met a friend the other day who had seen Wordsworth's House the other Week--You will be glad to hear that I have finished my second Book1 that is if this catches you at your Street-door--I have been gadding and did not see your Note2 time to answer it sooner. Let me hear from Devon again--

Your's like a Pyramid
John Keats--

My Brother George desires to be remembe〈r〉ed to you--


46. To JOHN TAYLOR. Thursday 5 Feb. 1818.

Address: John Taylor Esqre ∣ 91 New Bond Street.

Postmark: 5 FE 1818.

Fleet Street Thurs. Morn

My dear Taylor,

I have finish'd coppying my Second Book1 but I want it for one day to overlook it--and moreover this day I have very particular employ in the affair of Cripps--so I trespass on your indulgence and take advantage of your good nature.

You shall hear from me or see me soon. I will tell Reynolds of your engagement--tomorrow.

Your's unfeignedly
John Keats--


47. To GEORGE AND THOMAS KEATS. Saturday 14 Feb. 1818.

Address: Messrs. Keats Teignmouth Devon.

Postmark not recorded.

Hampstead Saturday Night.

My dear Brothers

When once a man delays a letter beyond the proper time, he delays it longer for one or two reasons; first, because he must begin in a very common-place style, that

____________________
1
Of 'Endymion'.
2
Keats first wrote 'Notn' for 'Note in', then over-wrote the 'n' with an 'e' and forgot to write 'in' after it. It is altogether a hastily written letter and bears signs of a spluttering quill.

-100-

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