The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

My dear Reynolds,

In hopes of cheering you through a Minute or two, I was determined nill he will he to send, you some lines so you'll excuse the unconnected subject, & careless verse. You know, I am sure, Claude's Enchanted Castle, and I wish you may be pleased with my remembrance of it. The Rain is come on again I think with me Devonshire stands a very poor chance. I shall damn it up hill and down dale, if it keeps up to the average of 6 fine days in three weeks. Let me have better news of you.

Yr affectte Friend

John Keats

Toms Remembs to you. Remr

us to all--


59. To BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON. Wednesday 8 April 1818.

Address: B R Haydon Esqr ∣ Lisson Grove North ∣ Paddington Middx2

Postmarks: TEIGNMOUTH and 10 AP 1818.

Wednesday--

My dear Haydon,

I am glad you were pleased with my nonsense and if it so happen that the humour takes me when I have set down to prose to you I will not gainsay it. I should be (god forgive me) ready to swear because I cannot make use of you〈r〉 assistance in going through Devon if I was not in my own Mind determined to visit it thoroughly at some more favorable time of the year. But now Tom (who is getting greatly better) is anxious to be in Town therefore I put off my threading the County. I purpose within a Month to put my knapsack at my back and make a pedestrian tour through the North of England, and part of Scotland--to make a sort of Prologue to the Life I intend to pursue--that is to write, to study and to see all Europe at the lowest expence. I will clamber through the Clouds and exist. I will get such an accumulation of stupendous recollolections that as I walk through the suburbs of London I may not see them--I will stand upon Mount Blanc and remember this coming Summer when I intend to straddle ben Lomond--with my Soul!-galligaskins are

____________________
1
Another transcript reads 'scribble'.
2
The address was written by Tom.

-128-

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