The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

Mother and Sisters. Remember me to the Butlers--not forgetting Sarah.1

Your affectionate friend, John Keats


64. To JOHN HAMILTON REYNOLDS. Sunday 3 May 1818.

Address: Mr John H. Reynolds ∣ Little Britain ∣ Christs Hospital London.

Postmark: not recorded.

Teignmouth, May 3d.

My dear Reynolds.

What I complain of is that I have been in so an uneasy a state of Mind as not to be fit to write to an invalid. I cannot write to any length under a disguised feeling. I should have loaded you with an addition of gloom, which I am sure you do not want. I am now thank God in a humour to give you a good groats worth--for Tom, after a Night without a Wink of sleep, and overburdened with fever, has got up after a refreshing day sleep and is better than he has been for a long time; and you I trust have been again round the Common without any effect but refreshment.-- As to the Matter I hope I can say with Sir Andrew2"I have matter enough in my head" in your favor And now, in the second place, for I reckon that I have finished my Imprimis, I am glad you blow up the weather all through your letter there is a leaning towards a climate-curse, and you know what a delicate satisfaction there is in having a vexation anathematized: one would think there has been growing up for these last four thousand years, a grandchild Scion of the old forbidden tree, and that some modern Eve had just violated it; and that there was come with double charge

"Notus and Afer, black with thunderous clouds From Sierraleona.'3

____________________
1
In Letter 98, written at Hampstead, in the part dated January 2, 1819 (p. 260), Keats declares his intention of not going again to Butler's, and in Letter 111 (p. 280) writing from Bedhampton, January 24, 1819, Charles Brown mentions a proposed call on a Mr. Butler. See also Letter 50, p. 106 and n. 3.
2
Cf. Slender, "'Merry Wives of Windsor', I". i. 128.
3
"'Paradise Lost', x". 702-3.

-139-

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