The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

pass every imagination and defy any remembrance. I shall learn poetry here and shall henceforth write more than ever, for the abstract endeavor of being able to add a mite to that mass of beauty which is harvested from these grand materials, by the finest spirits, and put into etherial existence for the relish of one's fellows. I cannot think with Hazlitt that these scenes make man appear little. I never forgot my stature so completely--I live in the eye; and my imagination, surpassed, is at rest--We shall see another waterfall near Rydal to which we shall proceed after having put these letters in the post office. I long to be at Carlisle, as I expect there a letter from George and one from you. Let any of my friends see my letters--they may not be interested in descriptions--descriptions are bad at all times --I did not intend to give you any; but how can I help it? I am anxious you should taste a little of our pleasure; it may not be an unpleasant thing, as you have not the fatigue. I am well in health. Direct henceforth to Port Patrick till the 12th July. Content that probably three or four pair of eyes whose owners I am rather partial to will run over these lines I remain; and moreover that I am your affectionate brother John.


72. To GEORGE KEATS. Saturday and Sunday 27-8 June 1818.

Address: Mr George Keats Crown Inn Liverpool.

Imperfect postmarks: KESWICK and LIVERPOOL JY

Foot of Helvellyn. June 27

My dear George,

We have passed from Lancaster to Burton from Burton to En〈d〉moor, from En〈d〉moor to Kendal from Kendal to Bownes〈s〉 on turning down to which place there burst upon us the most beautiful and rich view of Winander mere and the surrounding Mountains--we dined at Bownes〈s〉 on Trout which I took an oar to fetch from some Box preserves close on one of the little green Islands. After dinner we walked to Ambleside down a beautiful shady Lane along the Borders of the Lake with

72. This letter reached Liverpool too late to catch George; it was redirected in red ink to Messrs. Frampton & Son, Leadenhall Street, London, and was returned to John, who mentioned this fact in his journal letter to George of September 1819. It is endorsed in the handwriting of Thomas Keats--'To be sent to George'.

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