The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

that when I am asleep you might sew my nose to my great toe and trundle me round the town like a Hoop without waking me--Then I get so hungry--a Ham goes but a very little way and fowls are like Larks to me--A Batch of Bread I make no more ado with than a sheet of parliament; and I can eat a Bull's head as easily as I used to do Bull's eyes--I take a whole string of Pork Sausages down as easily as a Pen'orth of Lady's fingers--Oh dear I must soon be contented with an acre or two of oaten cake a hogshead of Milk and a Cloaths basket of Eggs morning noon and night when I get among the Highlanders--Before we see them we shall pass into Ireland and have a chat with the Paddies, and look at the Giant's Cause-way which you must have heard of--I have not time to tell you particularly for I have to send a Journal to Tom of whom you shall hear all particulars or from me when I return. Since I began this we have walked sixty miles to newton stewart at which place I put in this Letter--to night we sleep at Glenluce--tomorrow at Portpatrick and the next day we shall cross in the passage boat to Ireland-- I hope Miss Abbey has quite recovered--Present my Respects to her and to Mr And Mrs Abbey--God bless you--

Your affectionate Brother John--

Do write me a Letter directed to Inverness. Scotland--


75. To THOMAS KEATS. Friday 3-Thursday 9 July 18181.

Address: Mr Thos. Keats Well Walk Hampstead Middx--

Imperfect postmarks: 1818 and JY 13.

Auchencairn July 3rd

My dear Tom,

I have not been able to keep up my journal completely on accou〈n〉t of other letters to George and one which I am writing to Fanny from which I have turned to loose no time whilst Brown is coppying a song about Meg Merrilies which I have just written for her--We are now in Meg Merrilies county and have this morning passed through some parts exactly suited to her--Kirk〈c〉udbright County is very beautiful, very wild with craggy hills some

____________________
1
Tom endorsed this letter--'Received 13 July Answered " " No 3--from John.'

-170-

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