The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

He said he had seen him at Glasgow 'in Othello in the Jew, I mean er, er, er, the Jew in Shylock' He got bother'd completely in vague ideas of the Jew in Othello, Shylock in the Jew, Shylock in Othello, Othello in Shylock, the Jew in Othello &c &c &c he left himself in a mess at last-- Still satisfied with himself he went to the Window and gave an abortive whistle of some tune or other--it might have been Handel. There is no end to these Mistakes-- he'll go and tell people how he has seen 'Malvolio in the Countess'--'Twelvth night' in 'Midsummer nights dream--Bottom in much ado about Nothing--Viola in Barrymore--Antony in Cleopatra--Falstaff in the mouse Trap1.--July 14 We enterd Glasgow last Evening under the most oppressive Stare a body could feel--When we had crossed the Bridge Brown look'd back and said its whole pop〈ulation〉 had turned to wonder at us--we came on till a drunken Man came up to me--I put him off with my Arm--he returned all up in Arms saying aloud that, 'he had seen all foreigners bu-u-ut he never saw the like o' me--I was obliged to mention the word Officer and Police before he would desist--The City of Glasgow I take to be a very fine one--I was astonished to hear it was twice the size of Edinburgh--It is built of Stone and has a much more solid appearance than London--We shall see the Cathedral this morning--they have devilled it into a 'High Kirk'--I want very much to know the name of the ship George is g〈one〉 in--also what port he will land in-- I know nothing a〈bout〉 it--I hope you are leading a quiet Life and gradually improving. Make a long lounge of the whole Summer--by the time the Leaves fall I shall be near you with plenty of confab--there are a thousand things I cannot write--Take care of yourself--I mean in not being vexed or bothered at any thing--God bless you!

John--


78. To THOMAS KEATS. Friday 17-Tuesday 21 July 1818. Address: Mr Thos Keats ∣ Well Walk ∣ Hampstead ∣ Middx-- Imperfect postmark: 30 JY 18182

Cairn-something July 17th--

My dear Tom,

Here's Brown going on so that I cannot bring to Mind

____________________
1
King. What do you call the play? Hamlet. The Mouse-trap.-- 'Hamlet', III. ii. 250.
2
A London postmark. Unfortunately Tom did not endorse this letter.

-184-

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