The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

affectionate and steady friend. There is no one I am more interested in--and there is no one that I have more pleasure in communicating my own happiness to. You will gratify me much by letting me have, whenever you have leisure, copies of what you write;--for more than myself have a sincere interest in you. When shall I see you--& when shall I go with you to Severn's

Your ever affectionate
Wedn Morn. J. H. Reynolds


91. To FANNY KEATS. Friday 16 Oct. 1818.

Address: Miss Keats Miss Tuckey's Walthamstow

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 16 OC 1818.

Hampstead Friday Morn

My dear Fanny,

You must not condemn me for not being punctual to Thursday, for I really did not know whether it would not affect poor Tom too much to see you. You know how it hurt him to part with you the last time. At all events you shall hear from me; and if Tom keeps pretty well tomorrow--I will see Mr Abbey the next day, and endeavour to settle that you shall be with us on Tuesday or Wednesday. I have good news from George. He has landed safely with our Sister--they are both in good health --their prospects are good--and they are by this time nighing to their journeys end--you shall hear the particulars soon--

Your affectionate Brother
John-----

Tom's love to you.


92. To FANNY KEATS. Monday 26 Oct. 1818.

Address: Miss Keats Miss Tuckey's Walthamstow--

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 26 OC. 1818.

My dear Fanny,

I called on Mr Abbey in the beginning of last Week: when he seemed averse to letting you come again from having heard that you had been to other places besides Well Walk. I do not mean to say you did wrongly in speaking of it, for there should rightly be no objection to such things: but you know with what People we are obliged in the course of Childhood to associate; whose conduct forces us into duplicity and fa〈l〉shood to them. To the worst of People we should be openhearted: but it is as well as things are to be prudent in making any communication

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