The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

104. To FANNY KEATS. Wednesday 30 Dec. 1818.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbey's Esqre ∣ Pancras Lane, Queen Street ∣ Cheapside.

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and DE 31 1818.

Wentworth Place Wednesday.

My dear Fanny,

I am confined at Hampstead with a sore throat; but I do not expect it will keep me above two or three days. I indended to have been in Town yesterday but feel obliged to be careful a little while. I am in general so careless of these trifles, that they tease me for Months, when a few days care is all that is necessary. I shall not neglect any chance of an endeavour to let you return to School--nor to procure you a Visit to Mrs Dilke's which I have great fears about. Write me if you can find time --and also get a few lines ready for George as the Post sails next Wednesday.

Your affectionate Brother

John--


105. To Mrs WYLIE. 〈Wednesday 30 Dec. 1818.〉

No address or postmark.

Wentworth Place.

My dear Madam,

A slight return of the sore throat to which I have been lately subject has prevented me from coming to see you. I am persu〈a〉ded to rest for a few days has I have already felt the benefit of a two days repose--On Wednesday next the Mail sails for Philadelphia--if I should not see you before Sunday, I think it would be better to enclose your letters to Mr Haslam. Tell Charles and Henry--Believe me

Your's affectionately

John Keats--

105This undated letter is written in the same bold hand as Letter 104 to Fanny Keats and, as far as I can judge from a photograph, on similar paper. It also tells the same story about his throat and the departure of the mail. I conclude it was written on the 30th of December, 1818.

-274-

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