The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

From BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON to KEATS.1 Friday 〈 1 Jan. 1819〉.

My dear Keats,

I am gone out to walk in a positive agony--my eyes are so weak I can do nothing to day--if I did to day I should be totally incapacitated to-morrow--therefore you will confer a great favor on me to come to-morrow instead between ten and eleven--as I shall walk about all day in the air, and perhaps will call on you before three --I hope in God, by rest to day--to be quite adequate to it tomorrow. Yours most affectly

Dear Keats

Friday Morning B R Haydon


106. To BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON. 〈Saturday 2 Jan. 1819.〉

No address or postmark.

Wentworth Place

My dear Haydon,

I had an engagement to day--and it is so fine a morning that I cannot put it off--I will be with you tomorrow-- when we will thank the Gods though you have bad eyes and I am idle.

I regret more than any thing the not being able to dine with you to day--I have had several movements that way --but then I should disappoint one who has been my true friend. I will be with you tomorrow morning and stop all day--we will hate the profane vulgar2 & make us Wings--God bless you

J. Keats

From BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON to KEATS.3Thursday 7 Jan. 1819.

No address or postmark.

My dear Keats,

I now frankly tell you I will accept your friendly offer; I hope you will pardon my telling you so, but I am disappointed where I expected

____________________
1
This letter is inserted in Haydon's Journal on the reverse of the leaf on which Letter 106 is fastened and immediately before the entries for the 31st of December 1818. I assign Haydon's letter to the 1st of January 1819 and Keats's to the following day.
2
Horace, 'Odes', III. i. I.
3
This letter is wafered into Haydon's Journal together with Letter 107 which seems to be a reply to it. Possibly Haydon wrote it on Thursday the 7th of January and kept it over until he could deliver it personally on the following Monday.

-275-

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