The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

desire that you should 〈do〉 me the justice to credit the unostentatious and willing state of my nerves on all such occasions. It has not been my fault. I am doubly hurt at the slightly rep〈r〉oachful tone of your note and at the occasion of it,--for it must be some other disappointment; you seem'd so sure of some important help when I last saw you--now you have maimed me again; I was whole I had began reading again--when your note came I was engaged in a Book--I dread as much as a Plague the idle fever of two months more without any fruit. I will walk over the first fine day: then see what aspect you〈r〉 affairs have taken, and if they should continue gloomy walk into the City to Abbey and get his consent for I am persuaded that to me alone he will not concede a jot.


122. To FANNY KEATS. Saturday 〈17 April 1819〉.

Address: Miss Keats Rd Abbey's Esqre Walthamstow

Postmark: HAMPSTEAD. Dated postmark illegible.

Wentworth Place Saturday--

My dear Fanny,

If it were but six oClock in the morning I would set off to see you today: if I should do so now I could not stop long enough for a how d'ye do--it is so long a walk through Hornsey and Tottenham--and as for Stage Coaching it besides that it is very expensive it is like going into the Boxes by way of the pit--I cannot go out on Sunday-- but if on Monday it should promise as fair as to day I will put on a pair of loose easy palatable boots and me rendre chez vous. I continue increasing my letter to George1 to send it by one of Birkbeck's sons who is going out soon-- so if you will let me have a few more lines, they will be in time--I am glad you got on so well with Monsr. le Curè-- is he a nice Clergyman--a great deal depends upon a cock'd hat and powder--not gun powder, lord love us, but lady-meal, violet-smooth, dainty-scented liry-white, feather-soft, wigsby-dressing, coat-collar-spoiling whisker- reaching, pig-tail loving, swans down-puffing, parson-

122. The holograph of this letter was given by Mrs. Llanos to Mr. Frederick Locker, afterwards Locker-Lampson. It is now in the Harvard College Library.

____________________
1
The reference is to the journal letter following this (No. 123), which was not finished till the 3rd of May, though begun in February.

-294-

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