The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

I might ride. Tomorrow I am engaged--but the day after you shall see me. Mr Brown is waiting for me as we are going to Town together, so good bye.

Your affectionate Brother John


132. To FANNY KEATS. 〈Wednesday 16 June 1819.〉

No address postmark.

Wentworth Place

My dear Fanny,

Still I cannot affo〈r〉d to spend money by Coachire and still my throat is not well enough to warrant my walking. I went yesterday to ask Mr Abbey for some money; but I could not on account of a Letter he showed me from my Aunt's Solicitor--You do not understand the business-- I trust it will not in the end be detrimental to you. I am going to try the Press onece more and to that end shall retire to live cheaply in the country and compose myself and verses as well as I can. I have very good friends ready to help me--and I am the more bound to be careful of the money they lend me. It will all be well in the course of a year I hope. I am confident of it, so do not let it trouble you at all. Mr Abbey showed me a Letter he had received from George containing the news of the birth of a Niece for us--and all doing well--he said he would take it to you--so I suppose to day you will see it. I was preparing to enqu〈i〉re for a Situation with an Apothecary, put 〈for but〉 Mr Brown persuad〈e〉s me to try the press once more; so I will with all my industry and ability. Mr Rice a friend of mine in ill health has proposed ret〈i〉ring to the back of the isle of wight--which I hope will be cheap in the summer--I am sure it will in the winter. Thence you shall frequently hear from me and in the Letters I will coppy those lines I may write which will be

____________________
Keats feared to undertake in consequence of the state of his throat. Otherwise this little note would seem to indicate a more serious premonitory condition of things than we have any warrant to suppose, seeing that the time was the middle of June, when, if at all, one would suppose, a walk to Walthamstow and back might have been safely undertaken.--H.B.F.

132. The second sentence of this letter evidently refers to the visit to Abbey that is mentioned in the next letter to Haydon as having taken place 'the day before yesterday'. If therefore the 17th of June is the right date for that letter, the 16th is the right date for this.

-350-

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