The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

Arriving at the Portal, gaz'd amain,
And enter'd wond'ring; for they knew the Street,
Remember'd it from childhood all complete,
Without a gap, but ne'er before had seen
That royal Porch, that high-built fair demesne;
So in went one and all maz'd, curious and keen.
Save one; who look'd thereon with eye severe,
And, with calm-planted steps, walk'd in austere;
'Twas Appolonius:--something to〈o〉 he laught;
As though some knotty problem, that had daft
His patient thought, had now begun to thaw,
And solve, and melt;--'twas just as he foresaw!

Soft went the music, and the tables all
Sparkled beneath the viewless banneral
Of Magic; and dispos'd in double row
Seem'd edged Parterres of white bedded snow,
Adorne'd along the sides with living flowers
Conversing, laughing after sunny showers:
And, as the pleasant appetite entic'd,
Gush came the wine, and sheer the meats were slic'd.
Soft went the Music; the flat salver sang
Kiss'd by the emptied goblet,--and again it rang:
Swift bustled by the servants:--here's a health
Cries one--another--then, as if by stealth,
A Glutton drains a cup of Helicon,
Too fast down, down his throat the brief delight is gone.
"Where is that Music?" cries a Lady fair.
"Aye, where is it my dear? Up in the air?"
Another whispers. 'Poo!' saith Glutton "Mum!"
Then makes his shiny mouth a napkin for his thumb. &c.
&c. &c.

This is a good sample of the Story.

Brown is going to Chi〈che〉ster and Bedhampton avisiting--I shall be alone here for three weeks--expecting accounts of your health.


150. To FANNY BRAWNE. Monday 13 Sept. 1819.

Address: Miss Brawne ∣ Wentworth Place ∣ Hampstead

Postmarks: LOMBARD ST. and 14 SE 1819

Fleet Street, Monday Morn

My dear Girl,

I have been hurried to Town by a Letter from my brother George; it is not of the brightest intelligence. Am

-382-

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