The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

157. To CHARLES WENTWORTH DILKE. Friday 1 Oct. 1819.

Address: Charles W. Dilke Esqre ∣ Navy Pay Office ∣ Somerset House, redirected to 3 Great Smith Street ∣ Westminster

Postmark: WINCHESTER 1 OC 1819

Winchester Friday Octr 1st

My dear Dilke,

For sundry reasons, which I will explain to you when I come to Town, I have to request you will do me a great favor as I must call it knowing how great a Bore it is. That your imagination may not have time to take too great an alarm I state immediat〈e〉ly that I want you to hire me a *couple of rooms in Westminster. Quietness and ch〈e〉apness are the essentials: but as I shall with Brown be returned by next Friday you cannot in that space have sufficient time to make any choice selection, and need not be very particular as I can when on the spot suit myself at leisure. Brown bids me remind you not to send the Examiners after the third. Tell Mrs D. I am obliged to her for the late ones which I see are directed in her hand. Excuse this mere business letter for I assure you I have not a syllable at hand on any subject in the world.

Your sincere friend

John Keats--


158. To BENJAMIN ROBERT HAYDON. Sunday 3 Oct. 1819.

Address: B. R. Haydon Esqre ∣ Lisson Grove North ∣ Paddington

Postmark: WINCHESTER 3 OC 1819

Winchester Sunday Morn.

My dear Haydon,

Certainly I might: but, a few Months pass away before

157. Lord Houghton, referring here to Keats and Brown, says-- 'The friends returned to town together, and Keats took possession of his new abode. But he had miscalculated his own powers of endurance: the enforced absence from his friends was too much for him, and a still stronger impulse drew him back again to Hampstead.'

158. It will be observed that, while Keats's attitude towards the genius of Haydon shows no change in this letter, there is, when we compare it with former letters, a certain reserve of tone, quite corresponding with the altered personal attitude referred to in the letter to George Keats (p. 419).--H.B.F.

____________________
*
A Sitting Room and bed room for myself alone.

-431-

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