The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

seeing you again--my Life seems to stop there--I see no further. You have absorb'd me. I have a sensation at the present moment as though I was dissolving--I should be exquisitely miserable without the hope of soon seeing you. I should be affraid to separate myself far from you. My sweet Fanny, will your heart never change? My love, will it? I have no limit now to my love--You〈r〉 note came in just here--I cannot be happier away from you. 'Tis richer than an Argosy of Pearles. Do not threat me even in jest. I have been astonished that Men could die Martyrs for religion--I have shudder'd at it. I shudder no more--I could be martyr'd for my Religion--Love is my religion-- I could die for that. I could die for you. My Creed is Love and you are its only tenet. You have ravish'd me away by a Power I cannot resist; and yet I could resist till I saw you; and even since I have seen you I have endeavoured often 'to reason against the reasons of my Love'.1 I can do that no more--the pain would be too great. My love is selfish. I cannot breathe without you.

Yours for ever

John Keats.


161. To FANNY KEATS. Saturday 16 Oct. 1819.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbeys Esqre ∣ Walthamstow--

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 16 OC 1819 Wentworth Place

My dear Fanny,

My Conscience is always reproaching me for neglecting you for so long a time. I have been returned from Winchester this fortnight and as yet I have not seen you. I have no excuse to offer. I should have no excuse. I shall expect to see you the next time I call on Mr A about Georges affairs which perplex me a great deal--I should have to day gone to see if you were in Town, but as I am in an i〈n〉dustrious humour (which is so necessary to my livelihood for the future) I am loath to break through it though it be merely for one day, for when I am inclined I can do a great deal in a day--I am more fond of pleasure than study (many men have prefer'd the latter) but I have become resolved to know something which you will credit when I tell you I have left off animal food that my brains may

____________________
1
Ford ''Tis Pity she's a Whore', I. iii.

-436-

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