The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

never henceforth be in a greater mist than is theirs by nature--I took Lodgings in Westminster for the purpose of being in the reach of Books, but am now returned to Hampstead being induced to it by the habit I have acquired of this room I am now in and also from the pleasure of being free from paying any petty attentions to a diminutive house-keeping. Mr Brown has been my great friend for some time--without him I should have been in, perhaps, personal distress--as I know you love me though I do not deserve it, I am sure you will take pleasure in being a friend to Mr Brown even before you know him. My Lodgings for two or three days were close in the neighbourhood of Mrs Dilke who never sees me but she enquires after you--I have had letters from George lately which do not contain, as I think I told you in my last,1 the best news. I have hopes for the best--I trust in a good termination to his affairs which you please god will soon hear of--It is better you should not be teased with the particulars. The whole amount of the ill news is that his mercantile speculations have not had success in consequence of the general depression of trade in the whole province of Kentucky and indeed all america. I have a couple of shells for you you will call pretty.

Your affectionate Brother

John--


162. To FANNY BRAWNE. Tuesday 19 Oct. 1819.

Address: Miss Brawne, Wentworth Place, Hampstead.

Postmarks: COLLEGE ST and 19 OC 1819 Great Smith Street Tuesday Morn

My sweet Fanny,

On awakening from my three days dream ("I cry to dream again")2 I find one and another astonish'd at my idleness and thoughtlessness. I was miserable last night --the morning is always restorative. I must be busy, or try to be so. I have several things to speak to you of tomorrow morning. Mrs Dilke I should think will tell you

____________________
1
i.e. No. 146, p. 375, but he did not mention the contents. It was in No. 153, p. 392, to Dilke that he used, as here, a negative phrase: 'not the most comfortable intelligence.'
2
'The Tempest', III. ii. 152-5.

-437-

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