The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

that I purpose living at Hampstead. I must impose chains upon myself. I shall be able to do nothing. I sho〈u〉ld like to cast the die for Love or death. I have no Patience with any thing else--if you ever intend to be cruel to me as you say in jest now but perhaps may sometimes be in earnest be so now--and I will--my mind is in a tremble, I cannot tell what I am writing.

Ever my love yours

John Keats


163. To JOSEPH SEVERN. Wednesday 〈 Oct.?〉 1819.

Address: Joseph Seve〈r〉n Esqre ∣ 6 Goswell Street Road ∣ Opposite Spencer Street.

Postmark: HAMPSTEAD. No date.

Wentworth Place Wednesday

Dear Severn,

Either your Joke about staying at home is a very old one or I really call'd. I dont remember doing so. I am glad to hear you have finish'd the Picture and am more anxious to see it than I have time to spare: for I have been so very lax, unemployed, unmeridian'd, and objectless these two months that I even grudge indulding (and that is no great indulgence considering the Lecture is not over till 9 and the lecture room seven miles from wentworth Place) myself by going to Hazlitt's Lecture.1 If you have hours to the amount of a brace of dozens to throw away you may sleep nine of them here in your little Crib and chat the rest--When your Picture is up and in a good light I shall make a point of meeting you at the Academy if you will let me know when. If you should be at the Lecture tomorrow evening I shall see you--and congratulate you heartily--Haslam I know "is very Beadle to an amorous sigh"2

Your sincere friend

John Keats.

163. The letter is inscribed ' 1819' in Severn's handwriting; it pro-
bably belongs to the end of October. The picture was that of 'The
Cave of Despair': see Letters 167 and 168, pp. 442, 444. I am inclined
to think that more notes than appear here passed between Keats and
Severn before the poet visited the Academy.

____________________
1
Lectures on the Dramatic Literature of the Age of Elizabeth, at the Surrey Institution, Blackfriars Road.
2
Cf. 'Love's Labour's Lost', III. i. 185.

-438-

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