The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

170. To FANNY KEATS. Monday 20 Dec. 1819.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbey's Esqre ∣ Walthamstow
Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 20 DE 1819

Wentworth Place
Monday Morn--

My dear Fanny,

When I saw you last, you ask'd me whether you should see me again before Christmas. You would have seen me if I had been quite well. I have not, though not unwell enough to have prevented me--not indeed at all--but fearful le〈s〉t the weather should affect my throat which on exertion or cold continually threatens me. By the advice of my Doctor I have had a wa〈r〉m great Coat made and have ordered some thick shoes--so furnish'd I shall be with you if it holds a little fine before Christmas day. I have been very busy since I saw you especially the last Week and shall be for some time, in preparing some Poems to come out in the Spring and also in h〈e〉ightening the interest of our Tragedy. Of the Tragedy I can give you but news semigood. It is accepted at Drury Lane with a promise of coming out next season: as that will be too long a delay we have determined to get Elliston to bring it out this Season or to transfer it to Covent Garden. This Elliston will not like, as we have every motive to believe that Kean has perceived how suitable the principal Character will be for him. My hopes of success in the literary world are now better than ever. Mr Abbey, on my calling on him lately, appeared anxious that I should apply myself to something else--He mentioned Tea Brokerage. I supposed he might perhaps mean to give me the Brokerage of his concern, which might be executed with little trouble and a good profit; and therefore said I should have no objection to it especially as at the same time it occur〈r〉ed to me that I might make over the business to George--I questioned him about it a few days after. His mind takes odd turns. When I became a Suitor he became coy. He did not seem so much inclined to serve me. He described what I should have to do in the progress of business. It will not suit me. I have given it up. I have not heard again from George which rather disappoints me, as I wish to hear before I make any fresh remittance of his property. I received a note from Mrs Dilke a few days ago inviting me to dine with her on Xmas day, which I shall do. Mr Brown and I

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