The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

if their best is not our best it is not their fault. When I am better I will speak with you at large on these subjects, if there is any occasion--I think there is none. I am rather nervous today perhaps from being a little recovered and suffering my mind to take little excursions beyond the doors and windows. I take it for a good sign, but as it must not be encouraged you had better delay seeing me till tomorrow. Do not take the trouble of writing much: merely send me my good night.

Remember me to your Mother and Margaret.

Your affectionate

J. K.


182. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈Feb. 1820〉

Address: Miss Brawne

No postmark.

My dearest Fanny,

Then all we have to do is to be patient. Whatever violence I may sometimes do myself by hinting at what would appear to any one but ourselves a matter of necessity, I do not think I could bear any approach of a thought of losing you. I slept well last night, but cannot say that I improve very fast. I shall expect you tomorrow, for it is certainly better that I should see you seldom. Let me have your good night.

Your affectionate

J-- K--


183. To JAMES RICE. Monday 14 Feb. 1820.

Address: Mr James Rice ∣ 50 Poland Street ∣ Oxford Street

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 16 FE 1820

Wentworth Place

Monday Morn.

My dear Rice,

I have not been well enough to make any tolerable rejoinder to your kind Letter. I will as you advise be very

182. Friends both of Keats and Miss Brawne naturally regarded the engagement as an imprudent one from the first; and the entire break-down of the poet's health must have brought all possible prudential considerations home very poignantly to his own mind as well as the minds of his friends. Some hint beyond what is expressed in the last letter had perhaps fallen from Keats in conversation,--some hint of readiness at all costs to release Miss Brawne from her engagement if she on her part were prepared to follow prudent counsels and accept such release.--H.B.F.

-464-

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