The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

Re〈me〉mber me to Reynolds and say how much I should like to hear from him: that Brown returned immediately after he went on Sunday, and that I was vex'd at forgetting to ask him to lunch for as he went towards the gate I saw he was fatigued and hungry.

I am

my dear Rice

ever most sincer〈e〉ly yours

John Keats

I have broken this open to let you know I was surprised at seeing it on the table this morning, thinking it had gone long ago1


184. To FANNY KEATS. Saturday 19 Feb. 1820.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbey Esqre ∣ Pancras Lane. Queen St ∣ Cheapside.

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 19 FE 1820

My dear Fanny,

Being confined almost entirely to vegetable food and the weather being at the same time so much against me, I cannot say I have much improved since I wrote last. The Doctor tells me there are no dangerous Symptoms about me and that quietness of mind and fine weather will restore me. Mind my advice to be very careful to wear warm cloathing in a thaw. I will write again on Tuesday when I hope to send you good news.

Your affectionate Brother

John --


185. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈Feb. 1820?〉

Address: Miss Brawne.

No postmark.

My dearest Fanny,

I read your note in bed last night, and that might be the reason of my sleeping so much better. I think Mr Brown is right in supposing you may stop too long with me, so very nervous as I am. Send me every evening a written Good night. If you come for a few minutes about six it may be the best time. Should you ever fancy me too low-spirited I must warn you to ascbribe it to the medicine I am at pre

____________________
1
Which accounts for the disparity between Keats's weekday and the dated postmark.

-466-

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