The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

sent taking which is of a nerve-shaking nature. I shall impute any depression I may experience to this cause. I have been writing with a vile old pen the whole week, which is excessively ungallant. The fault is in the Quill: I have mended it and still it is very much inclin'd to make blind es. However these last lines are in a much better style of penmanship thof a little disfigured by the smear of black currant jelly; which has made a little mark on one of the Pages of Brown's Ben Jonson, the very best book he has. I have lick'd it but it remains very purple1--I did not know whether to say purple or blue so in the mixture of the thought wrote purplue which may be an excellent name for a colour made up of those two, and would suit well to start next spring. Be very careful of open doors and windows and going without your duffle grey--God bless you Love!--

J. Keats--

P.S. I am sitting in the back room. Remember me to your Mother--


186. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈Feb. 1820?〉

Address: Miss Brawne.

No.postmark.

My dear Fanny,

Do not let your mother suppose that you hurt me by writing at night. For some reason or other your last night's note was not so treasureable as former ones. I would fain that you call me Love still. To see you happy and in high spirits2 is a great consolation to me--still let me believe that you are not half so happy as my restoration would make you. I am nervous, I own, and may think myself worse than I really am; if so you must indulge me, and pamper with that sort of tenderness you have manifested towards me in different Letters. My sweet creature when I look back upon the pains and torments I have suffer'd for you from the day I left you to go to the isle of Wight;

____________________
1
Keats wrote 'purplue', turned the first minim of the second 'u' into an 'e', and struck out the rest.
2
Miss Brawne had much natural pride and buoyancy, and was quite capable of affecting higher spirits and less concern than she really felt. But as to the genuineness of her attachment to Keats some of those who knew her personally have no doubt whatever.--H.B.F.

-467-

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