The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

From BRYAN WALLER PROCTERto KEATS. Friday 〈25 Feb. 1820〉.

Address: John Keats Esqre

No postmark.

Friday

25 Store Street

Bedford Square

My dear Sir,

I send you 'Marcian Colonna' which think as well of as you can. There is, I think, (at least in the 2nd and 3rd parts) a stronger infusion of poetry in it than in the Sicilian Story--but I may be mistaken.1 I am looking forward with some impatience to the publication of your book. Will you write my name in an early copy and send it to me?* Is not this a 'prodigious bold request'? I hope that you are getting quite well. Believe me very sincerely yours

B. W. Procter.


190. To JOHN HAMILTON REYNOLDS. Monday 28 Feb. 1820.

Address: Mr J. H. Reynolds 18 Portland Street Poland Street

Postmarks: LOMBARD STREET and 28 FE 1820

My dear Reynolds,

I have been improving since you saw me: my nights are better which I think is a very encouraging thing. You mention your cold in rather too slighting a manner --if you travel outside have some flannel against the wind --which I hope will not keep on at this rate when you are in the Packet boat. Should it rain do not stop upon deck though the Passengers should vomit themselves inside out. Keep under Hatches from all sort of wet.

I am pretty well provided with Books at present, when you return I may give you a commission or two. Mr B. C.1

____________________
*
This was written before I saw you the other day--Some time ago I scribbled half a dozen lines, under an idea of continuing and completing a poem to be called 'The Deluge'--what do you think of the Subject? The Greek Deluge I mean. I wish you would set me the example of leaving off the word 'Sir.'
1
"'Barry Cornwall'", Bryan Waller Procter ( 1787- 1874): "'Dramatic Scenes'", 1819; "'Marcian Colonna'" and "'A Sicilian Story'", 1820, &c. Keats wrote of this attention of Procter's both to Fanny Brawne and to Dilke; but he seems to have reserved for his intimate kindred spirit Reynolds his estimate of the merits of Procter's books, while sharing between Reynolds and others his appreciation of the author's politeness. He sent Procter a copy of "'Lamia, Isabella, &c.'" (now in the Forster collection in the Victoria and Albert Museum) inscribing it to

-470-

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