The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

202. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈March 1820?〉

Address: Miss Brawne

No postmark.

My dearest Fanny,

Though I shall see you in so short a time I cannot forbear sending you a few lines. You say I did not give you yesterday a minute account of my health. To-day I have left off the Medicine which I took to keep the pulse down and I find I can do very well without it, which is a very favourable sign, as it shows that there is no inflammation remaining. You think I may be wearied at night you say: it is my best time; I am at my best about eight o'Clock. I received a Note from Mr Proctor1 to-day. He says he cannot pay me a visit this weather as he is fearful of an inflammation in the Chest. What a horrid climate this is? or what careless inhabitants it has? You are one of them. My dear girl do not make a joke of it: do not expose yourself to the cold. There's the Thrush again--I can't afford it--he'll run me up a pretty Bill for Music--besides he ought to know I deal at Clementi's.2 How can you bear so long an imprisonment at Hampstead? I shall always remember it with all the gusto that a monopolizing carle should. I could build an Altar to you for it.

Your affectionate J. K.


203. To FANNY KEATS. Monday 20 March 1820.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbeys Esqre ∣ Walthamstow.

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD and 20 MR 1820

My dear Fanny,

According to your desire I write to day. It must be but a few lines for I have been attack'd several times with a palpitation at the heart and the Doctor says I must not make the slightest exertion. I am much the same to day as I have been for a week past. They say 'tis nothing but debility and will entirely cease on my recovery of my strength, which is the object of my present diet. As the

____________________
1
B. W. Procter: see Letter 190, p. 470.
2
Muzio Clementi ( 1752- 1832), composer and pianist, and senior partner in the firm of musical-instrument makers and music-publishers of 26 Cheapside, then styled Clementi, Collard, Davis and Collard.

-481-

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