The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

to-day before or after dinner as you may think fit. Remember me to your Mother and tell her to drag you to me if you show the least reluctance--

[Signature missing.]


207. To FANNY KEATS. Saturday 1 April 1820.

Address: Miss Keats Rd Abbey Esqre Walthamstow

Postmark: HAMPSTEAD: date illegible.

Wentworth Place April 1st

My dear Fanny--

I am getting better every day and should think myself quite well were I not reminded every now and then by faintness and a tightness in the Chest. Send your Spaniel over to Hampstead for I think I know where to find a Master or Mistress for him. You may depend upon it if you were even to turn it loose in the common road it would soon find an owner. If I keep improving as I have done I shall be able to come over to you in the course of a few weeks. I should take the advantage of your being in Town but I cannot bear the City though I have already ventured as far as the west end for the purpose of seeing Mr Haydon's Picture which is just finished and has m〈ade its〉 appearance., I have not heard from George yet since he left liverpool. Mr Brown wrote to him as from me the other day--Mr B. wrote two Letters to Mr Abbey concerning me--Mr A. took no notice and of course Mr B. must give up such a correspondence when as the man said all the Letters are on one side. I write with greater case than I had thought, th〈e〉refore you shall soon hear from me again.

Your affectionate Brother
John --

____________________
1
i.e. the private view of the picture of Christ's Entry into Jerusalem. The picture was exhibited at the Egyptian Hall, Piccadilly, and the private view was on Saturday, the 25th of March 1820. In Haydon's account of the triumphs of that day ('Autobiography', first edition of Taylor "'Life', 1", 371), he says: 'The room was full. Keats and Hazlitt were up in a corner, really rejoicing.''The Morning Post', March 30, 1820, names Sir W. Scott, Messrs. C. Lamb, Keats, and Procter, among the 'principal persons, distinguished for rank and talent, in the company'.

-484-

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