The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

Kentish Town is a Mile nearer to you than Hampstead-- I have been getting gradually better but am not so well as to trust myself to the casualties of rain and sleeping out which I am liable to in visiting you. Mr Brown goes on Saturday and by that time I shall have settled in my new Lodging when I will certainly venture to you. You will forgive me I hope when I confess that I endeavour to think of you as little as possible and to let George dwell upon my mind but slightly. The reason being that I am affraid to ruminate on any thing which has the shade of difficulty or melancholy in it, as that sort of cogitation is so pernicious to health, and it is only by health that I can be enabled to alleviate your situation in future. For some time you must do what you can of yourself for relief, and bear your mind up with the consciousness that your situation cannot last for ever, and that for the present you may console yourself against the reproaches of Mrs Abbey. Whatever obligations you may have had to her or her husband you have none now as she has reproach'd you. I do not know what property you have, but I will enquire into it: be sure however that beyond the obligations that a Lodger may have to a Landlord you have none to Mr Abbey. Let the surety of this make you laugh at Mrs A's foolish tattle. Mrs Dilke's Brother has got your Dog. She is now very well --still liable to Illness. I will get her to come and see you if I can make up my mind on the propriety of introducing a stranger into Abbey's House. Be careful to let no fretting injure you〈r〉 health as I have suffered it--health is the greatest of blessings--with health and hope we should be content to live, and so you will find as you grow older--I am my dear Fanny

your affectionate Brother
John--


212. To CHARLES WENTWORTH DILKE. 〈May 1820.〉

Address: C. W. Dilke Esqre

No postmark.

My dear Dilke,

As Brown is not to be a fixture at Ham〈p〉stead I have at last made up my mind to send home all lent Books. I

____________________
212
This letter has on it a pencilled memorandum assigning it to the year 1820. It would therefore seem to belong to the time just

-487-

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