The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

should have seen you before this--but my mind (h)as been at work all over the world to find out what to do--I have my choice of three things--or at least two--South America or Surgeon to an I〈n〉diaman--which last I think will be my fate--I shall resolve in a few days. Remember 〈me〉 to Mrs D. and Charles--and your Father and Mother.

Ever truly yours
John Keats


213. To FANNY BRAWNE. 〈May 1820.〉

Address: Mrs Brawne

No postmark.

My dearest Girl,

I endeavour to make myself as patient as possible. Hunt amuses me very kindly--besides I have your ring on my finger and your flowers on the table. I shall not expect to see you yet because it would be so much pain to part with you again. When the Books you want come you shall have them. I am very well this afternoon. My dearest . . .

[Signature cut off.1]

____________________
before the departure of Brown for Scotland on the 7th of May 1820. Dilke notes that ' Brown let his house, as he was accustomed to do in the summer--and therefore Keats was obliged to remove'. Brown was starting for a second Scotch tour--alone this time, except so far as the voyage down the river to Gravesend was concerned. As regards the scheme of becoming Surgeon on board an Indiaman, see Letters 127 and 128. A correspondent, signing himself 'Y', addressed a letter about Keats to the editor of "'The Morning Chronicle'", July 27, 1821, in which he stated--'He once said, that if he should live a few years, he would go over to South America, and write a Poem on Liberty, and now he lies in the land where liberty once flourished, and where it is regenerating.'
1
The piece cut off the original letter is so small that nothing can well be wanting except the signature,--probably given to an autograph-collector. This letter was of course written after Keats's removal from Wentworth Place to Wesleyan Place, Kentish Town, which, according to the letter written by the poet to his sister on the 4th of May 1820, was to have been accomplished by the 6th. The rest of the letters to Fanny Brawne all appear to have been written at Kentish Town, either at Wesleyan Place where Keats lodged up to the 23rd of June, or at Hunt's house in Mortimer Terrace to which he seems to have moved on that day.--H.B.F.

-488-

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