The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

two or three days have been getting a little stronger. I have no hopes of an entire reestablishment of my health under some months of patience. My Physician tells me I must contrive to pass the Winter in Italy. This is all very unfortunate for us--we have no recourse but patience, which I am now practicing better than ever I thought it possible for me. I have this moment received a Letter from Mr Brown, dated Dunvegan Castle, Island of Skye. He is very well in health and Spirits. My new publication has been out for some days and I have directed a Copy to be bound for you, which you will receive shortly. No one can regret Mr Hodgkinson's ill fortune: I must own illness has not made such a Saint of me as to prevent my rejoicing at his reverse. Keep yourself in as good hopes as possible; in case my illness should continue an unreasonable time many of my friends would I trust for my Sake do all in their power to console and amuse you, at the least word from me--You may depend upon it that in case my strength returns I will do all in my power to extricate you from the Abbies. Be above all things careful of your health which is the corner stone of all pleasure.

Your affectionate Brother
John --


222. To FANNY KEATS. Saturday 22 July 1820.

Address: Miss Keats ∣ Rd Abbey Esqre ∣ Walthamstow

Postmarks: HAMPSTEAD1 and 22 JY 1820

My dear Fanny,

I have been gaining Strength for some days: it would be well if I could at the same time say I 〈am〉 gaining hopes of a speedy recovery. My constitution has suffered very much for two or three years past, so as to be scar〈c〉ely

____________________
next, Mrs. Gisborne made the following entry in her journal: 'Wednesday 12 July. We drank tea at Mr Hunt's; I was much pained by the sight of poor Keats, under sentence of death from Dr Lamb. He never spoke and looks emaciated.' It was perhaps immediately upon this visit that Mr. Gisborne wrote to Shelley the communication which induced his letter to Keats dated the 27th of July 1820.--H.B.F.
1
The postmark is that of Hampstead; but Keats was certainly still at Kentish Town, whence the letter must have been carried to Hampstead and posted.

-498-

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