The Letters of John Keats

By Maurice Buxton Forman; John Keats | Go to book overview

INDEX OF FIRST LINES OF POEMS AND FRAGMENTS SCATTERED THROUGH THE LETTERS
A haunting music, sole perhaps and lone 381
Ah! ken ye what I met the day 179
All gentle folks who owe a grudge 186
Als writeth he of swevenis 417
As Hermes once took to his feathers light 326
Bards of Passion and of Mirth 265
Chief of organic numbers ! 85
Crystalline Brother of the belt of Heaven 66
Dear Reynolds! as last night I lay in bed 125
Ever let the Fancy roam 261
Fame like a wayward girl will still be coy 338
Fanatics have their dreams wherewith they weave 389
For there's Bishop's teign 116
Four Seasons fill the Measure of the year 112
Full many a dreary hour have I past 5
Give me your patience Sister while I frame 159, 408
God of the Meridian . 93
Great spirits now on earth are sojourning 10, 12
Happy, happy glowing fire 331
Hearken thou craggy ocean pyramid 181
He is to weet a melancholy Carle 324
Hence Burgundy, Claret, and Port 93
Here all the summer could I stay 116
How fever'd is that Man who cannot look 338
I had a dove and the sweet dove died 266
I look'd around upon the carved sides 388
If by dull rhymes our English must be chaind 342
It keeps eternal Whisperings around 20
Mortal! that thou may'st understand aright 388
Mother of Hermes! and still youthful Maia! 141
Muse of my Native Land! Loftiest Muse! 55
Nature withheld Cassandra in the skies 218
No! those days are gone away 97
Non ne suis si audace a languire. 389
Not Aladin magian 200, 412
Not as a Swordsman would' I pardon crave 430
O blush not so, O blush not so 92
O Goddess hear these tuneless numbers, wrung 340
O golden tongued Romance with serene Lute! 88
O soft embalmer of the still midnight 339
O Sorrow 58, 62
O thou whose face hath felt the Winter's wind 104
O what can ail thee Knight at arms 329
Of late two dainties were before me plac'd188
Old Meg she was a Gipsey 166, 171
Over the hill and over the dale 124
Pensive they sit, and roll their languid eyes 401
Read me a lesson, Muse, and speak it loud 208
Season of Mists and mellow fruitfulness 387
She wept alone for pleasures not to be 138
Souls of Poets dead and gone 99

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