The Supreme Court of the United States: Its Foundation, Methods, and Achievements: An Interpretation

By Charles Evans Hughes | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

It would be futile to attempt in this brief course of lectures to review the history of the Supreme Court of the United States. What had been lacking in narratives of this sort, in order fully to understand the relation of the Court to the history of our country, has recently been supplied in Mr. Warren's comprehensive volumes. For the student of constitutional law nothing would suffice but a thorough-going analysis of many decisions and an impressionistic treatment would be but vexation. My endeavor will be simply to aid to some extent in the interpretation of an institution which despite its constant and unique service is a mystery, I fear, to most of our people; to assist those, who are not aiming to become legal scholars, to understand something of its origin, of the principles that govern it, of its methods and of the important results of its work. Even with this limitation, much that I should like to say must be omitted.

-vii-

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The Supreme Court of the United States: Its Foundation, Methods, and Achievements: An Interpretation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • I- Introduction -- Foundations 1
  • II- The Court at Work -- Organization -- Methods 42
  • III- Achievements -- Cementing the Union 78
  • IV- The States and The, Nation 118
  • V- Liberty, Property and Social Justice 157
  • TABLE OF CASES CITED 243
  • Index 257
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