The Development of International Law after the World War

By Otfried Nippold; Amos S. Hershey | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

THE following presentation was originally intended to form the closing chapter of a larger work on international law in this1 war. The latter is not to appear before the conclusion of peace. The thought that the subject might perhaps be of special interest during the war itself has led me to publish the following material separately. But the larger work will present in greater detail the explanations leading to many of the conclusions drawn in the course of the following pages.

In accordance with its original character, this book offers only a survey of the future problems of international law. In this work I have given merely some directing outlines. I have been obliged to forgo entering upon the individual problems here, since this would have claimed materially more space and also more time. But I also believe that in the present hour it is above all necessary to call to mind once more the fundamental tendencies in the development of international law.

The problems to be solved for international law in the future are neither simple nor small in number. We may rejoice if, upon the conclusion of peace, we succeed in obtaining an agreement on the basic principles. The future work will, however, take decades.

Of course, I do not presume to be able to contribute much to the solution of these problems in this small work. However, I do not wish to leave unspoken the thoughts which have moved me in the present fateful hour of international law. I hope that some attention will gladly be given one who for a quarter of a century has laboured among the champions of the advancement of international law, and who in his presentations is guided by no other purpose than to win recognition and victory for law.

Whether the postulates here considered shall ever be fulfilled, and, if so, when, I do not presume to judge. I for my part am not enough of an optimist to believe that we shall attain everything,

____________________
1
[The first two parts of my work, Deutschland und das Völkerrecht, have now appeared: Part I, Die Grundsätze der deutschen Kriegführung, 1920, and Part II, Die Verletzung der Neutralität Luxemburgs und Belgiens, 1920.]

-ix-

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The Development of International Law after the World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • INTRODUCTORY NOTE v
  • Foreword ix
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Part I- INTERNATIONAL LAW 11
  • I- Ld Postulates 13
  • II- New Postulates 27
  • Part II- THE LAW OF WAR 107
  • Appendix 191
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