The Arthurian Legend in the Literatures of the Spanish Peninsula

By William J. Entwistle | Go to book overview

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MINOR GRAIL HEROES: GAWAIN, PERCIVAL. THE "FAULA" OF G. TORROELLA

SPAIN and Portugal were in this manner acquainted with Galahad's achievement of the Holy Grail as it was related by Robert de Boron, and a considerable knowledge of Walter Map's alternative version; they also knew, to some extent, the other Grail heroes, Gawain and Percival. In the Prose-LancelotGawain has the misfortune to blunder into the Adventurous Palace, and his discomfiture, which the author of the Demanda supposes us to know,1 is the result of his irreverence. When the Holy Vessel is borne into the banqueting hall by a maiden, her beauty alone attracts his eyes, so that he neither bows the knee nor prays; as he lies in his presumption on the Adventurous Bed, a mysterious lance stabs him; his rest is perturbed by voices, thunders, the combat of a lion and serpents, the lamentations of women, and a desperate personal struggle against an armed stranger. To the eyes of the hero, now lying bleeding and

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1
Demanda, cap. 323: "como Galuan e Gariete se fueron al palacio auenturoso. . . . Dixo Galuan: '¡Ay Señor Dios! si vos plugiere, dexadme entrar en el palacio auenturoso, e salir dende con mayor honra que otra vez sali.'" The extract from Lanzarote de Lago (Bibl. Nac., Madrid, MS. 9611, fols. 281-5) has been printed in the appendix to Bonilla, Leyesdas de Wagner ( Madrid, 1913). pp. 94-109. For Gawain as Grail hero see Encyclopædia Britannica, s.v. GRAIL. The Spanish account is the same as that in P. Paris, Romans de la Table Ronde, Lancelot, laisse cxxviii., or Sommer, Vulgate Version of the Arthurian Romances, iv. PP. 345-9.

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