History of the Labor Movement in the United States - Vol. 4

By Philip S. Foner | Go to book overview

CONTENTS
PREFACE9
1.BIRTH OF THE I.W.W.13
Preliminary Conferences14
Industrial Union Manifesto17
Revolutionary Syndicalism19
Response to Call for June Convention24
The Chicago Conventlon29
Industrial Workers of the World36
2.THE MOYER, HAYWOOD, PETTIBONE CASE40
The Assassination40
Orchard's "confession,"41
The Kidnapping46
Labor and Socialist Protestsz51
Haywood Trial55
3.THE I.W.W., 1905-190760
Reaction to Formation of I.W.W.60
I.W.W. Inroads on A.F. of L.62
The Russian Revolution68
I.W.W. Growth69
I.W.W. Leadership71
Second I.W.W. Convention and First Split74
Other Issues at 1906 Convention77
W.F. of M. Leaves I.W.W.78
Socialists and the I.W.W.79
4.THE. I.W.W., 1907-190981
Progress in Organization81
I.W.W. Strikes83
Third I.W.W. Convention98
Economic Crisis and the Unemployed 100
The Fourth Convention and the SecondSplit103
Results of 1908 Convention112
5.COMPOSITION AND PRINCIPLES114
Composition of the I.W.W115
Labor Solidarity123
The Class Struggle129
Religion, Patriotism, and Morality131
The One Big Union133
"Direct Action," Strike Tactics, Immediate Demands134
The General Strike and the New Society140
Concept of Leadership144
6.IDEOLOGY AND TACTICS147
Education147
I.W.W. Songs: Joe Hill151
Syndicalism, Sabotage, Violence157
Political Action167
7.THE FREE SPEECH FIGHTS, 1909-1911172
Pattern of I.W.W. Fights173
Missoula, 1909 175
Spokane, 1909-10177
Fresno, 1910-11185
8.THE FREE SPEECH FIGHTS, 1912-1914190
Aberdeen, 1911-12191
San Diego, 1912194
Other Free Speech Fights, 1912-13205
Kansas City, 1912209
Decline and Achievements of Free Speech Fights210

-5-

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