New Immigrant Literatures in the United States: A Sourcebook to Our Multicultural Literary Heritage

By Alpana Sharma Knippling | Go to book overview
6.
Ashraf Rushdy, NeoSlave Narratives, MS.
7.
The thesis of the centrality of genocide to North American-Armenian ethnic texts is argued powerfully by Marc Nichanian in Armenian and by Shirinian in English. Rubina Peroomian's Literary Responses to Catastrophe: A Comparison of the Armenian and the Jewish Experience ( Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1993) is a useful text that draws all its examples from Armenophone classics.
8.
The adjectives "diasporic" and "diasporan" are used interchangeably here, as in much writing on the topic. "Diasporic" has been constructed on the model of, and in rhyme with, "ethnic"; "diasporan," with "American" or "Armenian." Not a lexical investigation but the consensus of those who use the term professionally will eventually determine the "victor."
9.
Louis Althusser and Etienne Balibar, Reading Capital, trans. Ben Brewster ( London: Verso, 1979 or 1968), 14.
10.
Comments by two Americans in Fresno, documented in Richard T. La Piere, "The Armenian Colony in Fresno County, California," Ph.D. thesis, 1930, 339, 341.
11.
SS stands for Saroyan Special, a collection of his stories. See Bibliography.
12.
Jacques Derrida, "The Time Is Out of Joint," Deconstruction Is/In America, ed. Ansel Haverkamp ( New York: NYU Press, 1995), 30.
13.
All the characters are based on real people. Some retain their first names; others are renamed but are transparent to those who know the milieu. However, the words and thoughts assigned to these characters entirely serve Saroyan's purposes: a few of the things they say are nearly verbatim reproductions of what they actually said during Saroyan's frequent after-hours visits to Haratch's office, when alcohol and conversation created a small salon of diasporic thinkers. But most of their speeches are ventriloquized: Saroyan gives these characters the words and positions he needs to create a dramatic debate concerning ethnic identity caught between homeland and host land.
14.
In one of those coincidences that indicate how often art represents not what is, but will soon become, life, less than a year after Edgarian's work was published, the government of the Republic of Armenia asked (in March 1995) whether the teaching of genocide to those aged under twelve might transmit trauma too effectively. In homeland and diaspora both, the form in which the genocide must be remembered is now in dispute.

SELECTED PRIMARY BIBLIOGRAPHY

Akillian Michael. The Eating of Names: Poems. New York: Ashod Press, 1983.

Antreassian Jack. The Cup of Bitterness and Other Stories. New York: Ashod Press, 1979.

Arlen Michael. Exiles. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1970.

-----. Passage to Ararat. New York: Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 1975.

Arzoomanian Ralph. Four Plays. New York: Ararat Press, 1980.

Avakian Arlene Voski. Lion Woman's Legacy: An Armenian-American Memoir. New York: CUNY-The Feminist Press, 1992.

Balakian Peter. Reply from Wilderness Island. Riverdale-on-Hudson, New York: Sheep Meadow Press, 1988.

-----. Sad Days of Light. New York: Sheep Meadow Press, 1983.

Baliozian Ara. In the New World. New York: Voskedar Press, 1982.

-----. In the New World: Essays. New York: Voskedar Press, 1982.

-40-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Immigrant Literatures in the United States: A Sourcebook to Our Multicultural Literary Heritage
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.