Writing the Subject: Bildung and the African American Text

By Gunilla Theander Kester | Go to book overview

NOTES
1
Valerie Smith compares the slave narratives by Olaudah Equiano and Frederick Douglass to the classical Bildungsroman: "As the examples of Equiano and Douglass reveal, the representative hero of the slave narrative, like the archetypal hero of the Bildungsroman, moves from the idyllic life of childhood ignorance in the country into a metaphoric wilderness, in this case the recognition of his status as a slave" (33).
2
Blyden Jackson emphasizes the "drastic change" of one dominant function of the slave narrative by 1840: with Douglass' Narrative, it became openly abolitionist (110).
3
For a discussion of the historical and social frames in Wilhelm Meister, see Beddow.
4
Gates makes a similar comparison between Douglass' Narrative of the Life and the picaresque tradition as it was broken down into seven "characteristics" by Claudio Guillen ( 1987: 81-82). See also J. Lee Greene article "The Pain and the Beauty: The South, the Black Writer, and Conventions of the Picaresque," The American South: Portrait of a Culture, ed. Louis D. Rubin , Jr. ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP, 1980) 264-288.
5
In The Oxford Companion to English Literature ( Oxford: Oxford UP, 1985).
6
For a list of studies on the intertextual qualities in Invisible Man, see chapter one, notes 2-3.
7
For a discussion of Mikhail Bakhtin's concept of dialogization and its function in Invisible Man, see chapter one.
8
For an article on the role the blues plays in the healing processes among black women in novels by Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Gayl Jones, and Toni Cade Bambara see my "The Blues, Healing, and Cultural Representation," Women Physicians and Healers. Ed. by Lilian R. Furst (forthcoming).

-71-

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Writing the Subject: Bildung and the African American Text
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 20
  • 1 - The African American Double Subject: Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man 21
  • Notes 41
  • 2 - A Double Heritage: Invisible Man, Wilhelm Meister and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass 45
  • Notes 71
  • Notes 100
  • 4 - The Rhetoric of Freedom in Charles Johnson's Oxherding Tale and Sherley Anne Williams' Dessa Rose. 107
  • Notes 135
  • Conclusion REpresentation/PREsentation: Writing the Subject 137
  • Notes 150
  • SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY 151
  • Index 171
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