Visions of the Fantastic: Selected Essays from the Fifteenth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts

By Allienne R. Becker | Go to book overview

14
"Eros and the Mer": Poetry and an Exhibition of Art

Edward Carlos

The following set of drawings is entitled "Eros and the Mer." Each work has an individual title, a poem, metaphoric of the content and essence of the work and suggestive of the intent of the artist inferred as follows:

When you awaken from the deep sleep, there on the beach, you hear mermaids calling. Somewhere out in the far waters of the clouds the mermen fly with the white sea lion. The luminous, angelic maids swim with the irridescent rainbow trout. These creatures have entered your psychic space, like a dream, like a fantasy, to nudge your consciousness, having stimulated your perception which is your awakening. The fantasy as with all metaphor is the reality before you. You are the dream but you project the dream which is in you, inspiring and expressing. You encounter the creatures of the deep universe and the galaxy ocean beyond, and then the spiritual worlds beyond that, and you find yourself looking into a mirror, encountering these androgynous beings of timelessness.

What is the mer? Within our creative consciousness, the mer is that within us which seeks to renew itself in our spirit and heart, in our eyes that see, in our fingertips that reach out tentatively. The mer is that which is moving toward the deep variances in the perceiving soul, a revelation that only creation intends.

The mer in humankind is caught in the chaos, caught swirling, as if an apparition, in the dense atmosphere, like the depths of deep water surrounding the fish become the fish and the fish becomes the water. The mer is that beneath the surface, and that within, that pushes outward through the darkness of light, to light and its bright shadows, and to the after-imagery of a glimpse that permeates consciousness. The hue exists as an infinite variation of that which is deeper than love--the supposed, the imagined, freedom.

Bound within a double flesh and a double spirit, this mermaid is half flesh and half human; this merman is part physical/spiritual and part mythical/archetypal. S/he (pronounced "see") rises from within the wild sea of flesh, rises from the womb of the water to face the light, searching for its own mirrored in the eye of the other.

-105-

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