African Visions: Literary Images, Political Change, and Social Struggle in Contemporary Africa

By Cheryl B. Mwaria; Silvia Federici et al. | Go to book overview

11
Hybridity, Neouniversalist Cultural Theory, and the Comparative Study of Black Literatures

F. Odun Balogun

We are living in a momentous, if transistory, period as far as the study of world cultures is concerned. The written literatures by peoples of African descent have matured and gained international reputation with their writers in the last decade predominating in the list of the recipients of the most prestigious award in literature--the Nobel Prize. Eurocentricity is at last on the run and has recently been dealt a significant blow by the Charles Bernheimer Committee of the prestigious and standard-setting American Comparative Literature Association when the latter signaled its intention to make comparative literature truly universal in scope as well as in theoretical and critical practice. We are only too familiar with the notorious subversion of the true meaning of the word universal in Eurocentric discourse which had provoked the wrath of black scholars and writers in a spate of counterdiscourse publications nearly three decades ago. Wole Soyinka in Myth, Literature and the African World ( 1976) had among many of the book's wide-ranging project of redemptive poetics of culture, expressed dismay at the exclusion of non-European writing in the literary curricula of British universities. Houston Baker in Blues, Ideology and Afro- American Literature ( 1984) chastised the even more amazing omission of African American writing in official American literary scholarship. Achebe was so outraged that he recommended in the essay on colonialist criticism included in his Morning, Yet on Creation Day ( 1975) a temporary ban on the use of the word universal in the discussion of African literature until it was restored fully to its authentic meaning. The collective of black scholars who contributed to Addison Gayle Jr.'s The Black Aesthetic ( 1971) even went so far as to construct a black aesthetic theory to counter the prevailing Eurocentric aesthetic practice. In recent times, to promote multiculturalism and discredit resurgent white conservatism and racism that threaten its gains, black scholars have produced a new wave of publications, informed by modern discoveries in science, genetic

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
African Visions: Literary Images, Political Change, and Social Struggle in Contemporary Africa
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 282

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.