Pacific-Asia and the Future of the World-System

By Ravi Arvind Palat | Go to book overview

3
THE RISE OF EAST ASIA: ONE MIRACLE OR MANY?

Giovanni Arrighi, Satoshi Ikeda, and Alex Irwan


THE STYLIZED FACTS OF THE EAST ASIAN ECONOMIC MIRACLE

When we speak of an East Asian "economic miracle," we are referring, implicitly or explicitly, to two main facts. On the one hand, we refer to the rise of several new centers of capital accumulation in East Asia--centers that have come to enjoy a command over world resources comparable to that traditionally enjoyed by the wealthier states of the capitalist world-economy. On the other hand, we also refer to the fact that this phenomenon is unusual--in fact, "miraculous"--in light of the predominant tendency in other low- and middle-income locations of the world-economy to lose ground, rather than gain, relative to traditionally wealthy states.

In order to gauge the extent and nature of this economic miracle, we shall use a very simple indicator: the ratio expressed as a percentage, of the GNP per capita of a region or jurisdiction to the GNP per capita of what we shall call the "organic core" of the world-economy. This ratio measures the income gap that separates that region or jurisdiction from the organic core--an aggregate defined here as consisting of all the states that over the last half-century or so have occupied the top positions in the global hierarchy of wealth and, by virtue of that position, have set (individually or collectively) the standards of wealth to which all other states have aspired.

These core states belong to three distinct geographical regions. The most segmented of the three regions, culturally and jurisdictionally, is Western Europe, defined here to include the United Kingdom, the Scandinavian and the Benelux countries, the former West Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and France. The states lying on the western and southern outer rim of the region (that is, Ireland, Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Greece) have not been included in the organic core because,

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pacific-Asia and the Future of the World-System
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.