Oldest Allies, Guarded Friends: The United States and France since 1940

By Charles G. Cogan | Go to book overview

Preface
This work consists of a series of case studies on the relationship between the United States and France since World War II, beginning with the trouble that arose between Charles de Gaulle and Franklin Roosevelt after the French defeat in 1940. It is not a linear treatment of this relationship since the "great misunderstanding" of 1940, but rather reference is made, where necessary, to other events outside the study (for example Suez, Indochina, the Common Agricultural Policy) to establish some thread to the presentation.The work begins with several observations of a general order on the French- American relationship, and some reflections on the political cultures and historical background. Then, after examining the deep trouble of the wartime period, which was not only between senior American officials and de Gaulle but also between the United States and France, 1 the work examines a series of episodes that serve as illustrations of the French-American relationship, and the difficulties of this relationship, in various areas: economic relations, approaches to strategy, decolonization, nuclear relations, and transatlantic relationships. Without being exhaustive, this account serves, rather, to illustrate the problems and the specific nature of the French-American relationship. The episodes are:
The debate on the interim aid to France in late 1947 (economic chapter).
The debate on the European Defense Community (EDC) and the failure of the EDC proposal in 1954 (defense case).
The raid on Sakhiet-Sidi-Youssef in Tunisia in February 1958 and the Anglo-American good offices mission, which was the straw that broke the camel's back of the Fourth Republic (decolonization case).
The debate on the Multilateral Force (MLF), the background of which lies parallel to the American refusal of nuclear "sharing' and the French quest for an atomic bomb,

-xi-

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Oldest Allies, Guarded Friends: The United States and France since 1940
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Note xii
  • Introduction 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - The Falling Out 19
  • Notes 49
  • 3 - The Turning Point 55
  • Notes 71
  • 4 - La Grande Nation, La Grande Armée1 75
  • Notes 95
  • 5 - The Reversal 99
  • Notes 117
  • 6 - The Multilateral Force: The Two Hegemons 121
  • Notes 146
  • 7 - Posthumous Coronation and Détente: The Year of Europe 151
  • Notes 172
  • 8 - Euro-Corps: Return of the Ambivalences 177
  • Notes 195
  • 9 - Epilogue: by Default of Enemies? 199
  • Notes 215
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 227
  • About the Author 235
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